Saturday, March 25, 2017

Chicago Film Club field trip: “North By Northwest” April 2 at ShowPlace ICON at Roosevelt Road

Directed by Hitchcock—“The Master of Suspense”—and starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint, and James Mason, North By Northwest is one of the classiest espionage films ever made. 

Grant plays advertising executive Roger O. Thornhill (ROT) who is mistaken for an American agent and framed for murder. Saint plays the mistress of real spy Mason and is used as bait to catch Grant. 

The movie features some great Chicago locations, including the Ambassador East Hotel, the old LaSalle Street train station, and a glimpse of late-1950s Michigan Avenue. 

The success of this film led to Grant being offered the role of James Bond, which he turned down. Grant thought he was too old to play Ian Fleming’s famous agent 007

If you want to purchase your ticket in advance, click here. Tickets are also available at the theater.

After the movie, depending on interest, we may go into the Lobby Lounge to discuss the film. We did this after All About Eve and it was a lot of fun.

First-timers: Look for me with the meetup sign before the theater entrance.


Monday, March 20, 2017

Screening of “The More the Merrier” at Daystar Center April 4

Classic Movie Man Favorites Series: The More the Merrier
Where: Daystar Center, 1550 S. State Street
When: April 4, 2017
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Hosted by Stephen Reginald

The More the Merrier (1943) is one of the great romantic comedies released during the height of World War II.

Due to the housing shortage in Washington, D.C., retired millionaire Benjamin Dingle rents a room from the ultra patriotic Connie Milligan (Jean Arthur). After spending some time with Connie, Dingle decides that she needs to be married to a “clean-cut” young man in the person of Joe Carter (Joel McCrea), so Dingle rents half of his room to Joe. This causes all kinds of problems. Problem number one, Connie is engaged to a Washington bureaucrat Charles J. Pendergast (Richard Gaines). Problem number two, she’s living with two single men!

When the press uncovers their “scandalous” habitation, it’s up to Mr. Dingle to set things straight. The trio of Arthur, McCrea, and Coburn are a real treat. Not only do they handle the dialogue with great skill, but they delight us with their amazing physical comedy as well.

The More the Merrier was nominated for six Academy Awards including Best Picture, Best Actress (Jean Arthur), Best Director (George Stevens), and Best Supporting Actor (Charles Coburn). Coburn was the only winner for his engagingly comic performance.

Jean Arthur, Charles Coburn, and Joel McCrea in close quarters in The More the Merrier

This film is part of the “Classic Movie Man's Favorite” series.

Have some Joe and Enjoy the Show!
You can bring food and beverages into the auditorium; we even have small tables set up next to some of the seats. General Admission: $5 Students and Senior Citizens: $3.

Join the Chicago Film club; join the discussion
Twice a month we screen classic films and have a brief discussion afterward. For more information, including how to join (it’s free), click here. The Venue 1550 is easily accessible by the CTA. Please visit Transit Chicago for more information on transportation options.


Stephen Reginald is a freelance writer and editor. He has worked at various positions within the publishing industry for over 25 years. Most recently he was executive editor for McGraw-Hill’s The Learning Group Division. A long-time amateur student of film, Reginald hosts “Chicago Film Club,” a monthly movie event held in the South Loop, for the past two years. Reginald has also taught several adult education film classes at Facets Film School, Chicago.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Screening of “The Mad Miss Manton” at Daystar Center April 1

“Stanwyck on State Street” Film Series: The Mad Miss Manton (1938)
Where: The Venue 1550 at the Daystar Center, 1550 S. State Street, Chicago, IL
When: April 1, 2017
Time: 6:45 p.m.
Hosted by Stephen Reginald

Heiress Melsa Manton (Stanwyck) and her Park Avenue society friends are constantly pulling pranks. This puts them at odds with the law and makes them the subject of negative stories in the press. When Melsa discovers a murder victim in a vacant building, she has a hard time convincing the police she’s telling the truth.


With the help of her Park Avenue pranksters, Melsa plays detective, putting her at odds with newspaper editor Peter Ames (Henry Fonda). Peter thinks Melsa and her ilk are foolish, spoiled, rich kids with too much time on their hands. Peter’s negative articles about Melsa and her friends drive Melsa crazy. She’s desperate to be taken seriously in spite of her less-than-serious reputation. Will Melsa be able to convince Peter that she’s not a dizzy heiress and help her solve the murder? The Mad Miss Manton was the first of three pictures that starred Stanwyck and Fonda and it’s a fun screwball romp in the tradition of My Man Godfrey and The Thin Man.

The Mad Miss Manton is part of the “Stanwyck on State Street” Film Series.

Have some Joe and Enjoy the Show!
You can bring food and beverages into the auditorium; we even have small tables set up next to some of the seats. General Admission: $5 Students and Senior Citizens: $3.

Join the Chicago Film club; join the discussion
Twice a month we screen classic films and have a brief discussion afterward. For more information, including how to join (it’s free), click here. The Venue 1550 is easily accessible by the CTA. Please visit Transit Chicago for more information on transportation options.


Stephen Reginald is a freelance writer and editor. He has worked at various positions within the publishing industry for over 25 years. Most recently he was executive editor for McGraw-Hill’s The Learning Group Division. A long-time amateur student of film, Reginald hosts “Chicago Film Club,” a monthly movie event held in the South Loop, for the past two years. Reginald has also taught several adult education film classes at Facets Film School, Chicago.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Screening of "Stella Dallas" at Daystar Center March 11

“Stanwyck on State Street” Film Series: Stella Dallas (1937)
Where: The Venue 1550 at the Daystar Center, 1550 S. State Street, Chicago, IL
When: March 11, 2017
Time: 6:45 p.m.
Hosted by Stephen Reginald


Growing up on the wrong side of the tracks, young Stella Martin (Stanwyck) manages to catch the eye of Stephen Dallas (John Boles), a well-bred business executive. The two fall in love and marry. For a time they’re happy, but after the birth of their daughter, Laurel (Anne Shirley), the marriage begins to deteriorate. Stella wants to go out dancing and rub elbows with the upper-class folks at the country club. Stephen expects his wife to be content to stay at home with their child, a much quieter existence than the life Stella desires. They eventually divorce, with Stella having the main custody of Laurel. Stella is determined to give her daughter the things she never had, but when Stephen begins a new relationship, Stella feels her closeness with Laurel slipping away. Always putting her daughter’s happiness above her own, Stella faces a choice no mother should have to make.

Barbara Stanwyck and Marjorie Main in Stella Dallas

Stanwyck received the first of her four Best Actress Oscar nominations for her role as Stella. Stanwyck was so determined to get the part that she submitted to a screen test—something unheard of for a star of her caliber. She convinced the director (King Vidor) and the producer (Samuel Goldwyn) that she could be convincing as a mother, especially as the character ages into midlife. The supporting cast includes Marjorie Main, Barbara O’Neil, and a very young Tim Holt.

Anne Shirley, who turned 18 during the filming of Stella Dallas had this to say about Stanwyck: “She was prepared to the very top of her ability. Dialogue learned perfectly. Hair, clothes, energy ready.”

This film is part of the “Stanwyck on State Street” series.

Check out the introduction to Stella Dallas by Robert Osborne and Drew Barrymore.


Have some Joe and Enjoy the Show!
You can bring food and beverages into the auditorium; we even have small tables set up next to some of the seats. General Admission: $5 Students and Senior Citizens: $3.

Join the Chicago Film club; join the discussion
Twice a month we screen classic films and have a brief discussion afterward. For more information, including how to join (it’s free), click here. The Venue 1550 is easily accessible by the CTA. Please visit Transit Chicago for more information on transportation options.


Stephen Reginald is a freelance writer and editor. He has worked at various positions within the publishing industry for over 25 years. Most recently he was executive editor for McGraw-Hill’s The Learning Group Division. A long-time amateur student of film, Reginald hosts “Chicago Film Club,” a monthly movie event held in the South Loop, for the past two years. Reginald has also taught several adult education film classes at Facets Film School, Chicago.

Looking for more "Stanwyck on State Street?" Look for The Mad Miss Manton to screen on April 1. This screwball comedy paired Stanwyck and Henry Fonda for the first time. They made a total of three movies together: The Mad Miss Manton (1938), The Lady Eve, and You Were Meant for Me (both 1942).


Saturday, February 25, 2017

10 Things You May Not Know About Barbara Stanwyck

Barbara Stanwyck (1907 – 1990) was one of the greatest movie stars from Hollywood’s Golden Age. She starred in many classic films, including the Pre-Code Baby Face (1933), Stella Dallas (1937), The Lady Eve (1941), and Double Indemnity (1944) to name a few. She became a major TV star portraying Victoria Barkley on the hit series The Big Valley (1965 – 1969). Find out how much you know or don’t know about this legendary actress.

1. Stanwyck (born Ruby Stevens) was orphaned at the age of four. She and her older brother Byron spent their childhood in and out of foster homes.

2. She was a dancer in the Ziegfeld Follies during the 1922 and 1923 seasons.

3. Her big break came on Broadway playing a chorus girl in The Noose (1926); this is when she became Barbara Stanwyck.

4. The next year, Stanwyck was the toast of Broadway for her starring role in Burlesque (1927).

5. Oscar Levant introduced Stanwyck to her first husband, Frank Fay.


Stanwyck, director Mitchell Leisen, and Fred MacMurray on the set of  Remember the Night (1940)


6. As Stanwyck’s star rose, Fay’s fell. Many believe their disintegrating marriage was the inspiration for the original film version of A Star Is Born (1937).

7. Zeppo Marx was Stanwyck’s manager and he along with Stanwyck and his first wife, Marion Benda, owned a thoroughbred horse farm called Marwyck.

8. In 1944 she was the highest paid woman in the United States.

9. She was nominated four times as Best Actress, but never won a competitive Oscar; she was awarded a special Academy Award in 1982.

10. Producer Earl Hamner Jr. originally wanted Stanwyck to play Angela Channing in the hit TV series Falcon Crest.

Looking for more information on this screen legend, check out A Life of Barbara Stanwyck: Steel True 1907- 1940 by Victoria Wilson.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Chicago Film Club field trip: “All About Eve” March March 5 at ShowPlace ICON at Roosevelt Road

Where: ShowPlace ICON, 150 W. Roosevelt Road, Chicago, IL 60605
When: March 5, 2017
Time: 2:00 p.m.
Hosted by Stephen Reginald
Run Time: 2 hours 30 minutes

From the moment she glimpses her idol on Broadway, Eve Harrington (Anne Baxter) strives to upstage Margo Channing (Bette Davis). After cunningly stealing Margo’s role, Eve disrupts the lives of anyone close to the actress in this timeless cinematic masterpiece. With its witty dialogue and knockout performances, the film earned a record 14 Oscar® nominations* and also features Marilyn Monroe in an early supporting role.


*1950: Best Picture (won), Supporting Actor (George Sanders, won), Costume Design (B&W, won), Directing (won), Sound Recording (won), Screenplay (won), Actress (Anne Baxter), Actress (Bette Davis), Supporting Actress (Celeste Holm), Supporting Actress (Thelma Ritter), Art Direction (B&W), Cinematography (B&W), Film Editing, Music (Score).

You can buy your ticket in advance by clicking here or purchase at your local theatre.

First-timers, look for me holding a Meetup sign below.



Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...